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20110301
20110331
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CSPAN 28
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English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
. phoenix, arizona on our line for republicans. what should the president say on the u.s. involvement in libya on monday? caller: if he's the intelligent president i want him to tell us why we're going into libya and not the sudan and not bahrain. i think it's un:tionable to open another front when we're spending millions a day on iraq and afghanistan and 50% of our revenue goes to defense. host: the sudan would be another front, too. caller: we could help solve that with humanitarian aid. with the cost in fossil fuels, if we paid the actual cost that fossil fuels cost us, we would pay $12.50 a gallon for gasoline because these wars are about oil. what i'm saying is if he's the innocent president then why doesn't he talk about -- intelligent president why doesn't he talk about the bahrain or sudan? he's doing it for oil just like the last -- just like the iraq war. and i think we need to question why we're doing these things. if we want to help people resisting and trying for democracy, let's do that. but let's not be hidden about our agenda.
for the u.s., the intel community, works very hard to provide the administration, whatever administration is, with the best information possible and available at that moment. whoever has the best information likely is going to make the best decisions in the best interest of the u.s., which is not to engage in war overseas. there is a tendency to think that is what we're doing, that are warmongers. the real world is, unfortunately, more difficult. i would argue that thegency, you know, is a tool used by any administration to enhance transparency, to minimize the risk that people face overseas, that the government faces overseas. then again people will be watching this. ey will think hey that mike baker is pretty subjective. hostmimike baker a >> president obama is speaking about libya later today from national defense university. ahead of the speech, the associated press wrote that the white house made it clear that it was not a precedent for involvement in other nations that hold strategic interests for the u.s.. we will have the president's speech live at 7:30 eastern and we will take your
at the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. while this committee does not have oversight on the safety of u.s. nuclear plants, we do have to consider how events such as those at fukushima affected the ability of our nation's nuclear freedom, 104 reactors, to supply electricity. of course, these 104 reactors currently account for about 20% of the electricity that we use and what the future of nuclear energy will be as part of our nation's energy banks. events at fukushima are changing by the our. they are serious, and we are watching those events unfold on the other side of the world. our knowledge at best is incomplete. as we look forward to these experts and forming a committee on what they see at the plant, how would impact our nation must existing fleet of reactors, and answer questions the committee members might have. before i introduce our two -- our first panel, we have four witnesses, two on this first panel and two on the second trip before i introduced the panel, let me call on senator murkowski for comment. >> let me welcome those who are presenting today. i appreciate the time is
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
. and in about 45 minutes, former u.s. comp then, political strategist maria cardona and john feehery and we will discuss the arab world with a former u.s. ambassador to morocco, marc ginsburg. on this channel, "washington journal" is next, live with your phone calls. later today, we will give you a brown paper -- roundtable that will include the mayor of boston, st. paul, the minnesota, green though, mississippi, and sacramento, california. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: the video on your screen is some of the latest footage on the air raids in libya, courtesy of the aljazeera network. with the president act in town, questions are being raised about u.s. policy and goals in libya. that is our discussion this morning on the "washington journal" as we go through the newspapers. what do you think? how is the president handling the libya conflict so far? 202 is the area code -- how do you think the president is handling the libyan conflict. yesterday speaker john boehner sent this letter to the president. speaker boehner list several questions he asks the question
and i think u.s. can be a little more creative in this area. iran has four main goals in afghanistan. one is to keep the taliban from completely taking over again, even though it plays a double or triple gain and give some support to taliban, it doesn't want taliban in the country. second is the extend the flow of drugs which has made iran the most addicted country in the world. a third is to do something about the sunni area which feeds a sunni in iran's own beluche area. and finally, iran wants the united states to withdraw is troops from afghanistan although i would think they would be prepared to have some limits provided there's assurance this would not be used as base that the united states could attack iran. some of these issues are already being explored. there was a track that explored in meetings and the iranian participants said they wanted to see a increased role for the united nations and the establishment of a core group to discuss afghanistan. similar to the bond groups that help set up the first government in afghanistan after the ove
that the white house says nato will take greater command authority leading to more questions as to who u.s. troops respond to. is it the u.s. military or nato? the present will talk about this tomorrow. guest: this shows that there is a concern at the white house about congress and the broader american public if they understand the mission or support the mission. that will be an issue for the next few days for the white house to address this and obama to define what his ideas are and how he wants to get there. host: we have the aljazeera washington chief and we have the reporter for "the washington post." good morning. caller: i am curious -- does any of this have to do with the arab countries and the turmoil? the issue that nobody wants to talk about has to be there. it has to be included in cnn. it is the country of israel. we have to get the shield away and not be able -- afraid to talk about the issues of israel and the palestinians. host: we will put that issue on the table right now. thank you. guest: the viewer raises a very important point. israel has as we all know, for several de
than gaddafi. host: we will he coverage of the president's speech to the nation of the u.s. involvement in libya coming from the national defense university. live cerage at 7:30 p.m. eastern time, 4:30 p.m. on the west coast. for more details, go to our web span.org.uesc- next caller. caller: mike x brother in law as a retired navy cmdr. winners in this latest war is a military industrial complex. mike, you are a good spokesperson for t work complex. is there ever a program of conflict resolution? what if all of the people working for him on conflict resolution -- we have all of these people and putting troop on the ground. where is conflict resolution in this scenario? guest: i would argue that there has been a concerted effort to avoid escalating this problem in libya. we saw that early on when there was a great deal of complaining about the fact that we were not getting involved sooner. during the course of that, there was this conflict resolution effort. the problem is there was a drum beatrom both extremes sides. there was a call for a no-fly zone. some wanted to go out there immed
. >> of the united nations representative for afghanistan said the u.s.-led surge in the country is working. he spoke and the middle east institute in washington as the u.s. voted to extend its mission by one year. this is 55 minutes. >> he has come from new york where he was talking about afghanistan. i believe the security council is voting today. is that correct? on thursday, he was talking about the u.s. role in afghanistan and its camilla -- commitment to the development of the country. the u.n. plays an important role. there are 34 representatives in afghan provinces. they spent over $1 billion on the country last year. food programs, health services, and infrastructure and development. the afghans are asking to take a greater lead in all aspects of government and development and the efforts to achieve peace. staffan de mistura made it clear that the u.n. takes these calls for sovereignty. seriously. what are the challenges of handing over greater responsibility to the afghan government? how can the u.n. support the process and maintain its commitment to the development of afghanistan? these qu
, living in an economy where there is a u.s. and in the u.s.s.r., what is the role in this adulation? who has access to arms and weapons? for example, what is going on in mexico right now with the house world arms trade? host: we're talking with all of you today. you can call in about your thoughts on the 30th anniversary of the reagan assassination attempt, or you can send as a tweak on twitter. there are the addresses. we are also asking the question on our facebook page. if you want, you can continue that conversation on that side as well. montana on the republican line. caller: i am a republican. host: and you are on the air. caller: high among the republican committee of great falls, montana. i am a republican. hello? host: you have to turn your television down. that is why we're having confusion here. an independent scholar, that morning. caller: i am 27 years old, so i was born about that time. but i went for social studies of that nature. there was a lot of racial disparity, well our clients and all day, to make the majority of white folks look get blacks as lazy, did not want to
university. the actions the u.s. has taken. the transition to nato command. monday at 7:30 eastern. c-span and c-span radio. >> i am not interested in developing a strategy to win the primary and not winning the general. we have done well everywhere. >> rick santorum sits down to discuss a presidential bid in 2012. on c-span. >> as protest continue, and as nato sets to take control find the latest from the administration officials . all searchable on your computer. watch what you want, when yo u want. >> a look between the relations between the u.s. and libya. this is about 45 minutes. van is a securities studies adjufpkt professor at georgetown university and joins us to talk about the relations between the united states and libya both on diplomat and military fronts. take us through the evolution of the relationship between u.s. and libya say from the mid 60s up through the present. guest: i think it's important to start earlier than that if we look back at the time period when it wasn't libya yet it was actually part of the otoman empire. and if you listen to the
the effort to topple a dictatorship. with the u.s. currently involved in afghanistan, iraq, and providing large-scale humanitarian assistance in japan, it does not diminish." collins of maine said this. "i remain troubled that the president did not seek congressional consent in the absence of a national emergency. libya does not affect our country's vital interest." the president talked about who will lead and when. here is what he had to say. >> this transfer from the united states to nato will take place on wednesday. going forward, the lead in enforcing the no-fly zone and protecting civilians on the ground will transition to our allies and partners. i'm fully confident that our coalition will keep the pressure on gaddafi's remaining forces. in that effort, the united states will play a supporting role, including intelligence, logistical support, search and rescue assistance, and capabilities to jam regime communications. because of this transition to a broader nato-based coalition, the risk and cost of this operation to our military and to american taxpayers will be reduced significan
likely have to put u.s. troops on the ground to accomplish that mission, or risk killing many civilians from the air. the danger posed to our men and women in uniform would be far greater. so would the cost and our share of the responsibility for what comes next. to be blunt, we went down that road in iraq. thanks to the extraordinary sacrifices of our troops and the determination of our diplomats, we are hopeful about iraq and their future, but regime change there took eight years, thousands of american and iraqi lives, and nearly a trillion dollars. that is not something we can afford to repeat in libya. as the bulk of our military effort ratchets down, what we can do, and we will do, is support the aspirations of the libyan people. we have intervened to stop the massacre, and we will work with our allies and partners to maintain the safety of civilians. we will deny the regime arms, cut off its supplies of cash, assist the opposition, and work with other nations to hasten the day when gaddafi leaves power. it may not happen overnight. a badly weakened gaddafi is trying desperately to
said in a potential intervention would come with regret. u.s. and allied forces meeting in paris to talk about potential military action. president obama said yesterday that the united states will take part in a no-flight effort. -- no-fly effort. we want to get your thoughts on the u.s. joined the no-fly effort. here is how you can contribute this morning. here iare the numbers at the bottom of your screen. the president announcing yesterday in a statement about the united states supporting a no-fly zone. this has been done by several allies. we will take a look at the headlines on "washington journal" this morning. mr. obama sketched out an american military role. -- rule. you have probably seen other headlines this morning as well. meetings are going on to talk about the strategy with the united states and other allied forces. the president made the statement yesterday about joining the no- fly zone effort. he spoke about what the united states will not do. here is what he had to say. >> i want to be clear about what we will not be doing. the united states is not going to depl
on the ground were the clearest indication that intensive air strikes carried out by the u.s., french and naval assets over the past week have softened up the libyan military considerably. meanwhile, the front page of " the new york times" - below the fold in the new york times, there's a story on the event recovered live on c-span yesterday. this is prompting us to ask republicans to define what will define the gop primary. with that, republicans only -- 202 the area code. our first call is from ardmore, oklahoma. caller: good morning. i believe the people of united states, their first concern is the economy. another thing we have to be concerned about is full disclosure. in this administration under obama, there has never been such hit in things. he spends money like going to brazil and giving out this money. they owe us tons of money. under the clinton years clinton lent them $100 billion. it goes on and on and on. when did congress lose the power of the purse? the other thing which is the greatest thing in our nation is we have to come back to god and of this nation repents if my people cal
, can you elaborate? >> i have had the privilege in this job a traveling to half of the u.s. attorney's offices across the country. as part of our visits to make sure that we are aggressively enforcing civil rights laws and listening, we are listening and learning as i did in chicago from. sticklers north dakota muslim sheik is on committee. it really tears my heart out to listen to this story. i will never forget a trip to tennessee where and iman talks about how his son does not want to go to school because he is so scared every day. they were telling him, go home, you terrorist. this is his own. we see this across the country. we see this in a wide array of areas, employment, religious zoning context, school context. >> according to data from the equal opportunity employment commission, muslims of 0.45% of religious discrimination cases. those i mentioned earlier comprise less than 1% of the population. "there is a level of hatred and animosity that is shocking. i have been doing this for 31 years, i have never seen such an to pass the toward workers." among other things, the suit
taking place there, then briefings that took place earlier today with the u.s. ambassador to libya. and white house press secretary carney announced that president obama will deliver a speech soon on libya and the region. and finally, more from french president sarkozy. but first, today's vote in the canadian house of commons, opposition members toppled prime minister stephen harper 166-145. we'll show you the vote and the comments of the prime minister and opposition leader, it's about an hour and a half. >> you're looking at a live shot on parliament hill. everyone on the inside is not as stately and calm as it is on the inside. they're waiting for a historic nonconfidence vote on an issue of contempt. that will make history. you're watching a special live edition of showdown in parliament. i want to welcome our viewers on the main network in saskatchewan and alberta. welcome to this unfolding story about our country and as we head toward an election, it will all hinge on what you're about to see in the matter of minutes ahead. we're waiting for the speaker of the house, peter mi
.p.a. regs hanging over their head. the regulatory flexibility act. shaded areas indicate u.s. you is session. the 2009 research -- that's the word i can't read, organizations. look at how this is. this is what's happening from regulations. it's going up. on the unemployment scale. the r.e.f. requires the federal agencies to assess the economic impact on small business, we talked about that. to come up with alternatives because unemployment rates are around or above 9% for the past 22 months, it's time that we make these regulations be assessed and seven out of 10 of the new jobs are created by these small businesses. when you hear us talk about the pesticide act, it's very clear, there's the folks that are dealing with it right there. the farmers of america. and it's duplicative. that means they already have a permit that allows them to put out these pesticides and because of this ruling they're having to make -- get another permit at another cost and meet other guidelines for these pesticides. the sixth circuit, we think with this, made a bad ruling and these higher costs to producers and c
the transfer to nato leadership by wednesday. the u.s. will turn over the reins. the coalition has 16 members of the data. we will show you those if you have not seen the list. let's take a call from deidre alabama, a democrat. >> i want to say kudos to president obama. he did what he needed to do. i feel as a democrat that a man with his intellect knows exactly what he is doing. i believe the american people should stand behind him and understand he is doing what he can to keep us safe and other countries save as well. >> what was the most powerful argument the president made tonight for your ears? >> he made so many good, valid points. as far as the no-fly zone, as far as i am concerned, like what happened with 9/11, i do not feel if president obama was president at the time that would have happened. what he is doing is heartfelt. he cares for all of these other countries. he cares for the american people. >> mike is in new haven ohio, an independent there. did the president make the case for you tonight? >> no, he did not. people better wake up. he starts a war, it takes off for brazil, an
the news of the day. weekdays, watch live coverage of the u.s. house. weeknights, congressional hearings and policy forums. also, supreme court oral arguments. on the weekend, you can see our signature programs. you can also watch our programming any time at c- span.org. it is all searchable on our c- span video library. we will be back to our cbc simulcast of the expected no- confidence vote coming up at 2:00 p.m. eastern in the canadian house of commons. the conservative budget plan was unveiled tuesday, immediately rejected by the three opposition parties. they write with four parties holding seats in the house of commons, in addition to liberals and conservatives, it is difficult for a single party to gain a majority. the no-confidence vote should be coming up in about a half-hour, and we will bring you live coverage, simulcast with the cbc. >> which government do you trust with the democratic institution? >> what canadians want is stability. they want a steady hand on the wheel, a strong government, jobs, the economy, economic growth. >> a very rowdy question period earlier today. t
. in the u.s., they're not concerned so they lobby in a different direction. >> thank you. i will ask one more question. this is my second round. if you fast forward to today and look at the other end of the buchan, march 4, 2011, problems we have now, the chair has described moral hazard and the like. we talked about that. what did you do? i can anticipate your answers as i think you've given them, just to make it very clear on the record, what would you recommend march 4, 2011? >> briefly, first, i want to emphasize the things we have said. one, you need more capital. and that you need increasing capital has to be with the size of the bank's, the risk of too big to fail. it has to be that this distortion has to be eliminated. secondly, if you have a problem, you should play by the ordinary rules of capitalism. when you go into bankruptcy, you convert that to equity. it is really a version of the standard rules of capitalism. you look at the numbers back in citibank, they had enough long- term capital it was more than enough to manage them, more than we put in. the answer -- the resoluti
assault, assistance from the u.s. and other air forces. i am against it. i think, again, if the french and other allies feel they have a strategic interest in taking this battle on behalf of opposition all the way to tripoli, then let them land of the foreign legion in tripoli and let them take on this fight. this is what the french government wants. they have a greater stake in the outcome than we do come and they do not think the united states has a core strategic interests getting involved any more than the military has done so, despite the clamoring of the opposition. this is something that is really of no great consequence to the united states, and that our allies want to take on the responsibility for this fight, we should let them do so. host: let's conclude with this question. what do you think will happen in libya, and if or when he leaves, who is his successor? guest: unless he continues to get hammered by other air forces, other than ourselves, he will continue to hold on. there is some hope on the part of the secretary of defense gates that there would be divisions within h
president william millar. frank gaffney talks about the u.s. response to the civil war in libya. and a look at the problem of bullying in schools with francisco negron of the national school board association. >> video this morning courtesy of al-jazeera. this is the nuclear reactor in japan. according to the associated press, an explosion there destroyed a building housing the reactor. and also there are fears that it could melt down after being hit by the earthquake and tsunami there in japan. again, those reports saying that large amounts of radiation were coming out in the evacuation around the plant expanded. but officials didn't know how dangerous at this time the leak was to people. again that courtesy there from al-jazeera this morning of the plant. now, in related use, there are also reports this morning as far as those who are affected, 1,300 dead, 2,000 people in emergency shelters. as you see there, people waiting on top of buildings to be rescued by various means this morning. this courtesy of n.h.k. and also there and 50,000 emergency crews. we registered in findin
-jazeera english. were you born in the u.s.? did you go to college here in washington? are you six-foot eight? [laughter] >> all of the above. i was born in egypt. my parents immigrated to the u.s. when i was 5 years old. went to school right down the street at american university. i started working for nbc news right across the street from american university. i started off as a desk assistant. i was handed out newspapers in the morning and answering phone calls. most of the time i was justin all of the correspondence, but it was a great environment to see how people operate in the high-pressure environment. the summer that i started i was actually going to leave journalism. my parents were like you have a master's degree, this is not what you're born to be working on. i actually stayed through by chance until 9/11 happened and the rules of the game completely changed. there was all this talk about the war in iraq following year. this is what led me to cnn and ultimately to iraq. >> you skipped one of the questions. >> 6 bef foot four. >> you have not mentioned saudi arabia in terms of unres
granted in clause 2-h of rule 2 of the rules of the u.s. house of representatives, the clerk received the following message from the secretary of the senate on march 30, 2011, at 9:32 a.m., that the senate passed without amendment h.r. 1079. with best wishes i am. signed sincerely, karen l. haas, clerk of the house. the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house the following enrolled bill. the clerk: h.r. 1079, an act to amend the internal revenue code of 1986, to extend the funding and expenditure authority of the airport and airway trust fund, to amend title 49, united states code, to extend the airport improvement program, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the chair will postpone further proceedings today on the motion to suspend the rules on which a recorded vote or the yeas and nays are ordered or on which the vote incurs objection under clause 6 of rule 20. any recorded vote on the postponed question will be taken later. for what purpose does the gentleman from ohio seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i move to suspend the
of the u.s. debate in part of the transfers to the transitional council? >> we haven't made a decision about arming the rebels or arms transfers, so there has not been any need to discuss that at this point. we did discuss nonlethal assistance and discussed ways of trying to enable the transition national council to meet a lot of their financial needs and how we could do that through the international community, given the challenges that sanctions pose, but recognizing they obviously are going to need funds to keep themselves going. we discussed a broad range of matters and certainly their presentation, which some of you may have seen earlier today as to what kind of civil society and political structure they are trying to build until libya, are exactly in line with what they have consistently said were their goals, their commitment to democracy and to a very robust engagement with people from across the spectrum of libyans is, i think, appropriate. we do not have any specific information about specific individuals from any organization who are part of this, but, of course, we are gett
that the majority of the u.s. segment was brought up a piece by piece. it will be truly amazing. >> congratulations on a successful mission. the question will be for someone who wants to tackle it. i do not think people on the ground can appreciate what the living spaces are like in the space station. now that it is complete can you talk a little bit about how large it is and how much space you had to move around in? >> just to start off, this space station is the largest pressurized volume in place in history -- in space in the history. i use the word that my son uses, which isginormous -- is g inormous. it is equivalent to a seventh 47 or bigger. it is oppressive -- a 747 or better. we can use every single one of the walls or models in a way that we cannot do on the ground. it makes for a wonderful resource for science and living and being up here floating around. it is great. >> i have a question about garbage, literally. how much trash does the iss generate? where do you put it and do you recycle? >> we do recycle certain things. we recycle our water and -- our urine and turned it into water. t
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)